International Women’s Day: Where Women Stand Today

Today is International Women’s Day, which has been celebrated for over 100 years. It is a day to celebrate the progress women have made.

Below are statistics I have taken from CNN on how women fare in health, employment, education and politics. From the statistics, I think it is clear that while women have made strides in all four areas, but there is still A LOT more work to be done.

Health and well-being

86 years — The average life expectancy for a woman in Japan, the longest in the world

81 years — The average life expectancy for a woman in the United States

44 years — The average life expectancy for women in Afghanistan and Zimbabwe, the shortest in the world

16.5 million — The approximate number of women living with HIV/AIDS worldwide, 50% of the total number

59% — The percentage of HIV-positive adults in Sub-Saharan Africa who are female, approximately 12.9 million people

21% — The percentage of HIV-positive adults in North America who are female, approximately 252,000 people

54% — The percentage of U.S. women who died of heart disease, cancer and strokes in 2007 out of all causes — approximately 658,000 people

177 — Number of countries that provide paid maternity leave

0 — Amount of paid maternity leave guaranteed in the United States

Labor and employment

91% — The percentage of a man’s paycheck that a woman in Sweden earns, working in manufacturing

57% — The percentage of a man’s paycheck that a woman in South Korea earns, working in manufacturing

81% — The percentage of a man’s paycheck that a woman in the United States earns, in all fields

58% — The percentage of U.S. women who participate in the work force, up from 33% in 1950

0Number of female CEOs in the top 20 companies on the Fortune 500

Education

86% — The percentage of girls enrolled in primary school worldwide

39 million — Number of girls worldwide who are not in school, 54% of the total number of children

850,000 — Number of girls in North America and Western Europe not in school

510 million — Number of illiterate women worldwide, two-thirds of the total number of illiterate people

87% — Percentage of U.S. women who have at least a high school diploma

28% — Percentage of U.S. women who have at least a college degree

Politics

95 — The number of women serving in the 112th Congress in the United States

17% — The percentage of U.S. Congress members who are female

56% — The percentage of Rwanda’s parliament who are female

2 — The number of countries that allowed women to vote in 1911

2 — The number of countries that prohibit women from voting in 2012 (Saudi Arabia and Vatican City)

 

 

Advertisements

About Haley Behre

I graduated from Syracuse University in December 2011 with majors in newspaper journalism and women and gender studies. Using these majors, I aspire to become a journalist who writes about human rights issues. I have held internships at the Syracuse New Times, Dash Media PR Firm, Syracuse Post-Standard and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. I also had an internship at the Not For Sale Campaign Syracuse chapter, which is a non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating human trafficking. I was born in Seoul, Korea on September 30, 1990 and moved to the United States before I was one year old. When I was 8, my family and I moved to Norwich, England for three years. While I was here I was immersed into a new culture and got to experience many things other children my age do not get to. Over the three years, I visited Ireland, France and the Netherlands several times, and Belgium, Wales and Sweden once. In the winter of 2010, I got an amazing opportunity to visit Kenya for a month. This was by far the single most eye-opening experience of my life thus far. The natural beauty of the landscape and its people do not compare to anything I have seen. I currently intern for the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press in the hopes of getting a full-time job at a newspaper or non-profit after.
This entry was posted in Transnational and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to International Women’s Day: Where Women Stand Today

  1. MrYoungScholar says:

    Reblogged this on mryoungscholar.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s