Ninety-two abducted children rescued in China in crackdown on human trafficking

We might live in a society where slavery has been formally abolished, but that does not mean it is nonexistent. Today, thousands of children, women and men are trafficked around the world to serve as prostitutes, workers, housemaids etc., forced to live in substandard conditions and earning little to no money. Some of these people are sold into the life by their parents or family members, others join willingly with a false hope of a better life and others are forced into. Whatever the circumstance, it does not matter since the trafficking of humans is illegal and needs to be eradicated.

Human trafficking is a REALITY, and one that can be found in their own backyard. Please help stop the trafficking of humans, like the 92 abducted children found in China.

Chinese police rescue 92 abducted children in crackdown on human trafficking

courtesy of: The Telegraph

Over 300 suspects were detained in latest operation by Chinese authorities to crack down on chronic problem of child trafficking linked to the country’s one-child policy.

Police forces from 11 provinces were involved in the operation to break up a massive network that stole, bought and sold children in Henan province in central China and other provinces.

Revealing one of the biggest busts of its kind in years, officials said on Saturday that the group had targeted children in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces in China’s southwest and transported them to other provinces for sale.

The exact date of the police operation, which was the result of a six-month investigation, is not known.

Child abduction is a major problem in China, where such police operations have become regular occurrences as authorities crack down on child trafficking.

Strict family planning laws, a traditional preference for boys, ignorance of the law, poverty and illicit profits drive a thriving market in babies and children.

State media did not give a breakdown of how many boys and how many girls were kidnapped, but kidnapped women are frequently sold to men in remote areas who are unable to find brides due to a sex imbalance resulting from the draconian one-child policy, which has also encouraged sex-selective abortions.

China also plans to introduce laws to punish buyers of children and parents selling their own children.

China has trumpeted the success of an intensified crackdown on the kidnapping and sale of children and women recently. In 2011, police said they had rescued more than 13,000 abducted children and 23,000 women over the past two years or so.

A U.N. committee is scheduled to issue on Oct. 4 its findings on China’s implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which Beijing ratified in 1992.

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About Haley Behre

I graduated from Syracuse University in December 2011 with majors in newspaper journalism and women and gender studies. Using these majors, I aspire to become a journalist who writes about human rights issues. I have held internships at the Syracuse New Times, Dash Media PR Firm, Syracuse Post-Standard and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. I also had an internship at the Not For Sale Campaign Syracuse chapter, which is a non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating human trafficking. I was born in Seoul, Korea on September 30, 1990 and moved to the United States before I was one year old. When I was 8, my family and I moved to Norwich, England for three years. While I was here I was immersed into a new culture and got to experience many things other children my age do not get to. Over the three years, I visited Ireland, France and the Netherlands several times, and Belgium, Wales and Sweden once. In the winter of 2010, I got an amazing opportunity to visit Kenya for a month. This was by far the single most eye-opening experience of my life thus far. The natural beauty of the landscape and its people do not compare to anything I have seen. I currently intern for the Reporters Committee for the Freedom of the Press in the hopes of getting a full-time job at a newspaper or non-profit after.
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